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Extract Directly from Time Machine

Normally you use Time Machine to restore lost data in a file like this: within the Time Machine interface, you go back to the time the file was not yet messed up, and you restore it to replace the file you have now.

You can also elect to keep both, but the restored file takes the name and place of the current one. So, if you have made changes since the backup took place that you would like to keep, they are lost, or you have to mess around a bit to merge changes, rename files, and trash the unwanted one.

As an alternative, you can browse the Time Machine backup volume directly in the Finder like any normal disk, navigate through the chronological backup hierarchy, and find the file which contains the lost content.

Once you've found it, you can open it and the current version of the file side-by-side, and copy information from Time Machine's version of the file into the current one, without losing any content you put in it since the backup was made.

Submitted by
Eolake Stobblehouse

 
 

Poll Preview: Rumor with a View

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Poll Preview: Rumor with a View -- As you'll read below, Apple last week filed a lawsuit against an unknown individual to prevent future leaks of confidential information. This move follows on the heels of Adobe's lawsuit against MacNN, although Apple's going after the source of the leak, not the sites that published the rumors. Consumers and industry watchers love to know what products might be coming, but leaks can prove financially damaging to Apple and other companies when consumers defer purchases of current products - and the financial health of these companies directly impacts their ability to make products users want and need. Our question then is, "Do you believe the value to consumers of information published on rumor sites outweighs the potential damage it does to the companies involved?" This is a serious question that reflects directly on issues surrounding consumer advocacy and the Macintosh community, so please, tell us where you fall in this debate by voting on our home page. [ACE]

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