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Extract Directly from Time Machine

Normally you use Time Machine to restore lost data in a file like this: within the Time Machine interface, you go back to the time the file was not yet messed up, and you restore it to replace the file you have now.

You can also elect to keep both, but the restored file takes the name and place of the current one. So, if you have made changes since the backup took place that you would like to keep, they are lost, or you have to mess around a bit to merge changes, rename files, and trash the unwanted one.

As an alternative, you can browse the Time Machine backup volume directly in the Finder like any normal disk, navigate through the chronological backup hierarchy, and find the file which contains the lost content.

Once you've found it, you can open it and the current version of the file side-by-side, and copy information from Time Machine's version of the file into the current one, without losing any content you put in it since the backup was made.

Submitted by
Eolake Stobblehouse

 
 

Symantec Releases Two Norton Bundles

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You may have thought Norton Utilities was a bundle of utility programs, but with Norton SystemWorks and Norton Internet Security, Symantec has gone one more step in bundling. Norton SystemWorks 1.0 puts the emphasis on hard disks with Norton Utilities 6.0, Norton AntiVirus 7.0, Dantz Development's Retrospect Express 4.0.3 backup utility, and Aladdin Systems' Spring Cleaning 3.5 uninstaller. Norton Utilities 6.0 itself seems a relatively minor upgrade, primarily encompassing improvements to volume recovery, especially when Norton FileSaver was not previously installed. Most of the features in Norton Utilities 6.0 are available to run on Mac OS X Public Beta disks as long as you boot from the CD-ROM or from a Mac OS 9 partition. Similarly, Norton AntiVirus 7.0 can run disk scans and repair infected files on Mac OS X Public Beta partitions as long as the program is launched from a Mac OS 9 partition or CD-ROM. The other two notable changes in Norton AntiVirus 7.0 are automatic virus scans and repairs in email attachments, plus simplified preferences. Norton SystemWorks is priced at a compelling (when compared with the prices of its components) $130 with upgrades available for Retrospect Express and Spring Cleaning users at $80. Norton Utilities 6.0 alone costs $100 with upgrades from previous versions at $50. Norton AntiVirus alone costs $70, with its upgrades from previous versions ringing up at $40.

<http://www.symantec.com/sabu/sysworks/mac/>
<http://www.dantz.com/index.php3?SCREEN=express>
<http://www.aladdinsys.com/springcleaning/>
<http://www.symantec.com/nu/nu_mac/>
<http://www.symantec.com/nav/nav_mac/>

The Norton Internet Security 1.0 bundle focuses on those of us with dedicated Internet connections, thanks to Norton Personal Firewall 1.0, Norton AntiVirus 7.0, and Aladdin's iClean 3.5 (for removing Web surfing tracks). The Mac OS 9-compatible Norton Personal Firewall incorporates technology from Open Door Networks' DoorStop Personal Edition and can block connection attempts from the Internet, notify users of such attempts, and log denied and allowed connections. It can also restrict access to Internet services by IP address and port number. Norton Personal Firewall replaces DoorStop Personal Edition, though Open Door continues to sell DoorStop Server Edition and is now working on Who's There?, a utility that works with DoorStop Personal Edition and Norton Personal Firewall to help users understand and deal with unauthorized access attempts. The bundle costs $100 with upgrades for users of Norton AntiVirus, DoorStop, Spring Cleaning, iClean and sidegrades for users of Intego's NetBarrier personal firewall and McAfee's Virex anti-virus utility at $70. By itself, Norton Personal Firewall costs $70 with upgrades (presumably from DoorStop Personal Edition, though that's not stated) at $40.

<http://www.symantec.com/sabu/nis/nis_mac/>
<http://www.aladdinsys.com/iclean/>
<http://www.symantec.com/sabu/nis/npf_mac/>
<http://www2.opendoor.com/doorstop/ DoorStopDetails.html>
<http://www2.opendoor.com/whosthere/>

System requirements sufficient for the components of both Norton SystemWorks and Norton Internet Security are a PowerPC-based Mac running Mac OS 8.1 or later with at least 24 MB of RAM.

 

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