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TidBITS#308/18-Dec-95

In our last issue of 1995, we bring you lots of news and updates, as well as an overview of what’s up with retro computer games, European online services, and shopping on the Web (with an eye towards finding holiday presents). Additional articles include a follow-up to our Quicken 6 review and information about the traditional Netter’s Dinner at the upcoming Macworld Expo in San Francisco. See you in 1996!

Adam Engst No comments

Administrivia

We're taking the next two weeks off, so don't look for TidBITS until the 08-Jan-96 issue. Happy holidays to you all, and may all your wishes come true

Tonya Engst No comments

PageMill Demo

PageMill Demo -- Intrigued by my PageMill review in TidBITS-305? Try the demo! The demo appears to be fully functional, except it cannot save or print

Geoff Duncan No comments

Symantec Announces Java Tools

Symantec Announces Java Tools -- Not to be left out of the Java frenzy sweeping the Internet, Symantec announced last week it has licensed the Java language technology from Sun Microsystems and released a Java development environment for Windows called Espresso

Geoff Duncan No comments

Not All that Flickers is Gold

Not All that Flickers is Gold -- There have recently been numerous reports of video flickering and color distortion in 5200-series Performas and LCs - particularly distressing to owners because the built-in monitors can't be detached for service

Adam Engst No comments

More Secure Mac Web Servers

More Secure Mac Web Servers -- StarNine recently released the $1,295 WebSTAR SSL Security Toolkit. The Security Toolkit includes WebSTAR/SSL, a version of WebSTAR that uses the open-standard SSL (Secure Socket Layer) protocol developed by Netscape Communications and RSA Technologies

Adam Engst No comments

It Takes Two to Tango

It Takes Two to Tango -- Web site developers may be interested in Tango, a new product from EveryWare Development. Tango enables Mac-based Web servers like WebSTAR to communicate with Butler SQL, EveryWare's relational database

Adam Engst No comments

PPP Comments & Updates

PPP Comments & Updates -- Travis Butler passed on a summary of the messages he received about his two-part PPP overview starting in TidBITS-306: Many comments concerned the now-defunct MacPPP 2.2.0a

David K. Dean No comments

Holiday Lights

Holiday Lights -- David K. Dean writes: I'd like to recommend Holiday Lights 3.0 from Robert Matthews of Tiger Technologies. It started out as Xmas Lights 1.0, then changed to Christmas Lights 1.0 (from the now-defunct Atticus Software), and has now become Holiday Lights 3.0

Adam Engst No comments

Shopping Online

Shopping has changed a bit over the last year thanks to all the retailers appearing on the Web. In 1993, sales via the Internet were estimated to total about $100,000; in 1995, that figure should be over $70 million, and current estimates for 1996 are over $500 million

Jason Snell No comments

Retro Software: Everything Old Is New Again

Although I own several compact discs by Journey and have been known to watch re-runs of Family Ties, I never thought I'd be nostalgic for the bad graphics and jerky animation of those Atari 2600 video games which appeared under the Christmas tree when I was a pre-teen

Stephen Becker No comments

Quicken 6 Follow-up

[This a follow-up to Steve's Quicken 6 review from TidBITS-299. -Geoff] Quicken 6 users should be aware of several bugs. Quicken's Portfolio window includes several performance calculations that may produce inaccurate or misleading results

Jon Pugh No comments

10th Annual SF Macworld Netter’s Dinner

For ten years we've been gathering a herd of nerds and feeding ourselves at the Hunan in San Francisco (on Sansome at Broadway). This year we have something new: online registration and payment. http://iw.cts.com/~jonpugh/nettersdinner.html ftp://iw.cts.com/public/JonPugh/ RegisterNettersDinner.hqx Due to the phenomenal 50 percent no-show last year, we had to do something about the low turnout