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TidBITS#393/18-Aug-97

Wondering what you’ll do next time you run into an extension conflict? Adam provides some ideas this week in his review of Casady and Greene’s Conflict Catcher 4.0. In addition, we continue Macworld coverage with our traditional Macworld Expo superlatives article; report on the cracking of Hacke, the Web server in the second Crack-A-Mac contest; follow up on the MacUser-Macworld merger; and note a number of techniques for avoiding Word macro viruses.

Geoff Duncan No comments

Cracked!

Cracked! To the surprise of the Macintosh Internet community, the second-generation Crack-A-Mac Web server security challenge noted in TidBITS-387 was successfully defeated last week

Adam Engst No comments

Macro Viruses (Slight Return)

I know I said I wouldn't write more about macro viruses a number of issues ago, but I couldn't resist passing on these useful pieces of information. Michael Gibbs comments: An ironic aspect of your warning regarding virus-infected disks from "official" sources is that most application installers recommend that you disable extensions, in many cases disabling your Mac's immune system

Jeff Carlson No comments

Macworld Boston ’97 Superlatives

One of the most enjoyable aspects of Macworld Expo is looking for items, products, and events that draw attention for unusual reasons. My search this year was rewarded with several that were out of the ordinary. Most Creative Use of a Pickle -- David Pogue, hawking his book, The Weird Wide Web, made a pickle glow and flash using a contraption he made from a wood frame, two nails to skewer the pickle, and a power cord from an old lamp

Adam Engst No comments

Magazine Merger Redux

I was deluged by responses to my article about Macworld and MacUser merging last week (TidBITS-392). Frankly, I was surprised by the volume, since I hadn't made any controversial comments in the article

Adam Engst No comments

Conflict Catcher 4.0 Ups the Ante

No program is ever finished - there's always room for improvements and added functionality. However, some programs are more evolved than others, sometimes to the point where it's difficult to think of new features or interfaces