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TidBITS#822/27-Mar-06

Your Honor, I object! We certainly didn’t intend this issue of TidBITS to focus on legal battles. It wasn’t our idea for the French to propose a law that would require Apple to allow any music player to play music from the iTunes Music Store. Plus, we simply couldn’t have predicted that the Apple Computer v. Apple Corps lawsuit would be scheduled for the same week that the Creative Commons license was upheld in Dutch court. And for the record, Your Honor, we also have a new DealBITS drawing, a great MacNotables podcast on email clients, and a slew of TidBITS Talk discussions. The defense rests.

Adam Engst No comments

MacNotables Podcast on Email Clients

MacNotables Podcast on Email Clients -- Few types of software engender the same level of loyalty as email clients. It makes some sense; an email program is the communications lifeline to the world for many of us, instant messaging notwithstanding, and we all end up with a lot of data - messages, addresses, carefully constructed folder hierarchies - in our email programs that would be difficult to transfer to another client

Adam Engst No comments

Creative Commons License Upheld in Dutch Court

Now this is interesting. The non-profit organization Creative Commons offers a set of copyright licenses that enable content creators to grant additional rights beyond those normally provided by copyright law - we publish TidBITS under a Creative Commons license (see "Seven Hundred Issues, a CMS, and Creative Commons" in TidBITS-700)

TidBITS Staff No comments

Hot Topics in TidBITS Talk/27-Mar-06

The first link for each thread description points to the traditional TidBITS Talk interface; the second link points to the same discussion on our Web Crossing server, which provides a different look and which may be faster. How to covert a music file to a Podcast? An attempt to make iTunes see an MP3 file as a podcast leads to discussions of how iTunes handles files