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TidBITS#148/19-Oct-92

Industry stories on hard drive prices and the PowerBook 100 phenomenon anchor this issue, which starts off with some comments on our KeyFonts review, covers some new CD-ROMs of several major Internet archives, passes on the good news that AppleShare 3.0.1 will work with QuickMail Server 2.5.x, and finally, takes a look at the Internet gateway to America Online and the brand new TidBITS library there.

Adam Engst No comments

Administrivia

Several people commented on Mark Nutter's review of the KeyFonts package, casting additional light on the package and the problems Mark noted. A few people expressed the opinion that giving 100 fonts, especially lower quality ones, to someone with no design sense was akin to handing a loaded machine gun to a monkey with fleas

Adam Engst No comments

Swanson Clarification

Swanson Clarification -- Mark H. Anbinder writes, "As we reported in last week's issue of TidBITS, there was some confusion as to the details of Randall Swanson's sentence in connection with the MBDF virus case

Don Rittner No comments

Internet CD-ROMs

(c) 1992 MUG News Service Having just returned from the CD-ROM Expo, I want to share a valuable find with you. Everyone knows there are thousands of files strewn around the Internet

Adam Engst No comments

Gateways III/America Online

Perhaps the most important new Internet gateway comes from the commercial service America Online. Although America Online took their time making the gateway available, it seems that they prompted two of the other commercial services, GEnie and Delphi, to open up Internet links as well

Adam Engst No comments

Driving a Hard Bargain

I hadn't checked up on hard drive prices seriously for some time because my storage needs, while continually outpacing my drive size, would do that to most any drive

Adam Engst No comments

The 100 Phenomenon

Poking around in the Sunday Seattle Times, I can't find a single PC-clone laptop for under $1000. Those that range around $1000 are all slow machines that would probably die a miserable death running Windows