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TidBITS#181/21-Jun-93

Read on for news of Apple’s troubles and John Sculley’s partial resignation, followed by Bill Dickson’s look at Xtras for System 7, an interesting attempt at avoiding standard software distribution methods. Jeff Needleman illuminates a subject we’ve never understood up to now, sharing SCSI devices between Macs and PCs, and finally, a look at why those PowerBook 170 screens break when you swear you weren’t playing Postal Worker Volleyball with it in the back room.

Adam Engst No comments

Symantec

Symantec recently shipped Symantec C++ 6.0, supposedly the first native C++ compiler on the Macintosh, along with THINK C 6.0 and Symantec C++ 6.0 for MPW

Adam Engst No comments

Sculley Steps Down

After 10 years of running Apple, John Sculley has announced that Michael Spindler, currently the company's president and COO (Chief Operating Officer), will replace him as CEO (Chief Executive Officer)

Bill Dickson No comments

Xtras for System 7

[Editor's note: This is the first in an informal series of articles exploring different methods of software distribution. It's clear, I think, that the current commercial channels prevent much good software from coming to market, and even when a program does make it, often the programmer(s) reap few rewards in comparison to the distributors and resellers in the middle, each with a markup and a profit margin

Jeff Needleman No comments

SCSI Double Agents

If you use both Macs and IBM clones, you've probably wondered if you could buy a tape drive or CD-ROM drive or a removable cartridge drive or WORM drive or whatever that could be used both for your Macs and for your IBMs

Adam Engst No comments

PowerBook 170 Screams, er, Screens

A month or so back, I suddenly noticed on the nets all sorts of reports from PowerBook 170 owners whose screens had just broken. In every case, the person was complaining on the nets because the screen replacement is expensive, and Apple claimed that the user had abused the screen