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TidBITS#356/02-Dec-96

Are you an established or aspiring Web author? Be sure to read Tonya’s detailed review of Adobe PageMill 2.0! Also this week, Apple confesses to a serious bug affecting some applications on 68K Macintoshes, Bare Bones Software release BBEdit Lite for OpenDoc, and Adam explains how to get "soft-power" Macs to restart after a power failure. And, if you don’t have time to read TidBITS each week, you can now have it read to you… on tape.

Geoff Duncan No comments

Disable the CFM-68K Runtime Enabler

Disable the CFM-68K Runtime Enabler -- If you use a Macintosh with a 68K processor, Apple is recommending that you disable the CFM-68K Runtime Enabler either by using an extensions manager or by removing it from your System Folder

Geoff Duncan No comments

BBEdit Lite for OpenDoc

BBEdit Lite for OpenDoc -- If you've installed version 1.1 of OpenDoc, then you might want to take note of BBEdit Lite for OpenDoc, a freeware Live Object which includes BBEdit's basic text-editing capabilities

Mark H. Anbinder No comments

QuickMail Express Available

QuickMail Express Available -- CE Software has released the free Internet mail client we mentioned a few weeks ago. QuickMail Express is a less powerful version of QuickMail Pro, their commercial POP3 client, and both are available for Macintosh and Windows

Tonya Engst No comments

TidBITS on Tape

TidBITS recently signed a licensing agreement with AudioMagNet, a new company that provides the service of converting Internet texts to audio cassette, using a 16-bit computer voice

Adam Engst No comments

The Power Key Mystery

This story starts back in July, when Geoff and I installed a Power Macintosh 7100/66 in the offices of Point of Presence Company, where our main Web and mail server (an Apple Workgroup Server 6150) also lives

Tonya Engst No comments

Adobe Grinds Out PageMill 2.0

Adobe PageMill 1.0 took the HTML world by storm when it shipped in late 1995. At the time, unlike anything else available, PageMill was able to generate HTML quietly while users set up Web pages in an environment resembling a simple word processor