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TidBITS#1116/05-Mar-2012

We’re busy preparing for Apple’s iPad announcement on Wednesday, but we have some great articles for you to read in the meantime. Adam leads with a look at how AT&T is now throttling unlimited plan users (their bandwidth, not them personally) when they hit 3 GB of usage and how affected users might be able to fight back. Then Jeff Carlson reviews Reflection, a Mac OS X application that acts as an AirPlay receiver, so you can mirror your iPad 2 or iPhone 4S display on the Mac, which is a boon to speakers, educators, and anyone who needs to demo iOS apps to a group. Finally, we look into Apple’s twice-delayed requirement that apps in the Mac App Store be sandboxed to see how it impacts developers and users alike. Notable software releases this week include Mac OS X 10.7.3 Supplemental Update; Hazel 3.0; GraphicConverter 7.6.2; DEVONthink Personal, Pro, and Pro Office 2.3.3; Firmware Update for MacBook Pro (15-inch, late 2008 models); HandBrake 0.9.6; Fetch 5.7.1; TextExpander 3.4.1; and iMac Wi-Fi Update 1.0.

Adam Engst 8 comments

AT&T Throttles Unlimited Plan Users at 3 GB

In a clarification of the company’s previous approach, AT&T is now throttling throughput speeds for users of unlimited data plans as soon as they exceed 3 GB of usage, exactly the same amount of data included in the similarly priced tiered plan. Mad about it? Consider taking AT&T to small claims court, as one iPhone user did successfully.

Jeff Carlson 3 comments

Reflection Mirrors iOS Devices on the Mac

An iPad 2 or iPhone 4S can mirror its display on an Apple TV, but not on a Mac. With the Mac OS X application Reflection, the iOS screen can now be mirrored on your Mac — perfect for giving presentations or recording what’s happening on the device.

TidBITS Staff No comments

ExtraBITS for 5 March 2012

Two quick bits for you this week — Apple’s 25 billionth App Store download and the New York Times revelation that third-party apps to which you give location permission also get access to your photo library.