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#1562: Tame Apple’s new Podcasts app, Standard Ebooks beautifies classic titles, using Xero for business accounting

Project Gutenberg has digitized over 60,000 books, but they’re often rather rough. If you’re interested in reading classic titles, check out the versions from Standard Ebooks, which are spruced up for modern devices. For those who use Apple’s Podcasts app, beware that the newest version may be chewing up free space on your iPhone, iPad, and Mac—read on to learn how to put a stop to its wanton downloading. Finally, Adam Engst explains why TidBITS has switched to Xero for accounting and why he’s never had so much fun running the numbers. Notable Mac app releases this week include Safari 14.1, Carbon Copy Cloner 5.1.26, Mailplane 4.3.2, and PDFpen and PDFpenPro 13.0.

Adam Engst 31 comments

Switching to Xero from AccountEdge

Technology transitions with accounting packages are scary—you don’t want to mess around with your organization’s financial tracking if you can avoid it. With MYOB AccountEdge failing to break through the 32-bit barrier, we at TidBITS chose to move to the cloud-based Xero. After a few initial setup confusions, Xero has given us a fast, modern workflow that makes managing our finances fun.

Watchlist

Safari 14.1 6 comments

Safari 14.1

Enables you to customize the Start Page section order and addresses a number of security vulnerabilities. (Free, various sizes, macOS 10.15+ and 10.14+)

Mailplane 4.3.2 No comments

Mailplane 4.3.2

Introduces a new preference option that automatically shrinks large images for better readability. ($29.95 new, free update, 78.2 MB, macOS 10.12+)

ExtraBITS

4 comments

Broadband Companies Faked 8.5 Million FCC Net Neutrality Comments

The New York attorney general’s office has found that 80% of the comments submitted to the US Federal Communications Commission about whether to repeal net neutrality were fake. Nearly half of those were bought by a consortium of broadband companies. The other half came from a 19-year-old college student.