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#1507: iPadOS 13.4, iOS 13.4, macOS 10.15.4 Catalina, watchOS 6.2, COVID-19 screening tool, O’Reilly exits in-person conferences, ordering online

The big news this week is Apple’s release of iPadOS 13.4 with trackpad support and the announcement of the trackpad-equipped Magic Keyboard, scheduled for May. Also new is the long-promised iCloud Drive folder sharing in macOS 10.15.4 Catalina, iOS 13.4, and iPadOS 13.4. watchOS 6.2, tvOS 13.4 and iOS 13.4 for HomePod are much smaller updates. In SARS-CoV-2 news that intersects with our world, Apple has released a COVID-19 Screening Tool app and Web site and media company O’Reilly announced it would be exiting the in-person conference business completely. Finally, if you’re in need of tech gear during this time, Josh Centers shares advice on ordering products and disinfecting them when they arrive. Notable Mac app releases this week include Ulysses 18.6, Security Update 2020-002 (Mojave and High Sierra), Safari 13.1, and Cyberduck 7.3.

Josh Centers 28 comments

Gearing Up During the Coronavirus Pandemic

Numerous brick-and-mortar stores are closed, and you’re likely stuck at home, perhaps without some gear you need to do your job. Josh Centers offers some advice about package precautions, why you may need to look beyond Amazon, and how Best Buy is adapting to the coronavirus pandemic.

Watchlist

Ulysses 18.6 No comments

Ulysses 18.6

Brings bug fixes and improved performance when loading large sheets to the writing app. ($39.99 annual subscription, free update, 18.9 MB)

Safari 13.1 13 comments

Safari 13.1

Patches a variety of security vulnerabilities for those running Apple’s last two operating systems. (Free, various sizes)

Cyberduck 7.3 No comments

Cyberduck 7.3

Adds label bookmarking capability and improves support for Google Drive and Backblaze B2. (Free, 101 MB)

ExtraBITS

3 comments

Coronavirus Tracking in Today’s Surveillance Society

Location tracking, facial recognition, and app-based tracking have become tools in fighting the spread of the SARS-CoV-2 coronavirus. But will these uses start a conversation about how to safeguard personal privacy or result in it being further exploited?